BMR Driveshaft Safety Loop Added to Project Boosted Coyote

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BMR Driveshaft Safety Loop Added to Project Boosted Coyote


If you enjoy drag racing your Mustang at the local track, you might have found yourself in need of a driveshaft safety loop. If you run with sticky tires or can get down 1320 fast enough to justify it — like Project Boosted Coyote, a 2015 Mustang GT targeting 1,000 hp — the track will likely require one for safety. Most drag strips have adopted the rules and regulations of the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA), one of the largest drag racing sanctioning bodies.

According to the 2019 NHRA rule book, Section 21:2.4 Driveline, Page 11; cars quicker than 13.99-seconds in the quarter mile with sticky tires and cars faster than 11.49-seconds in the quarter mile with stock tires require a driveshaft safety loop.

On rear-wheel drive applications like the Mustang, the driveshaft transfers torque from the output shaft of the transmission to the rear axles. As the transmission rotates, it spins the driveshaft which then turns the differential ring gear to rotate the wheels.

In the case of  a driveshaft failure, the Safety Loop helps contain the driveshaft and keeps it from ripping through the floor or digging into the track. Prior to the adoption of driveshaft safety loop a driveshaft failure could literally cause the car to “pole vault” down the track.

The location of the safety loop can vary from class to class, but in general, the NHRA stipulates the safety loop be “located behind but within 6-inches of the center of the front universal joint,” or used in place of a crossmember.

Project Boosted Coyote will be using BMR Suspension’s Driveshaft Safety Loop for S550 Mustangs (PN DSL017).

BMR Suspension offers a driveshaft safety loop for the S550 Mustang (PN DSL017) that complies with NHRA regulations and bolts-on using OE mounting holes from the factory transmission crossmember with supplied Grade 8 hardware. BMR’s driveshaft safety loop consists of 1/4-inch laser-cut CNC-formed plate steel and is available in black or red powder coat. The safety loop design also works with an MGW Shifter and ARH exhaust systems.

The kit includes longer bolts and new washers to accommodate the thickness of the mounting plates secure the driveshaft safety loop and cross member in position.

It is important to note that while a driveshaft safety loop is often required for drag racing, it also serves as inexpensive insurance to protect your car and provide peace-of-mind whether you are on the street or participating in other forms of track driving.

Even with an aftermarket driveshaft and other aftermarket parts installed on Project Boosted Coyote, the BMR safety loop goes on in about 15 minutes.

The install can be done on the garage floor with a jack and jack stands, though a lift does make it more manageable. You will need a jack or other means to support the transmission while you remove the crossmember bolts and install the driveshaft loop.

Once installed over the driveshaft, move the loop around to make sure the driveshaft has clearance, and the loop doesn’t interfere with any nearby components. Once it’s in place, let it hang until you have the mount installed.

The final step is to install the four bolts, nuts, and eight washers that secure the loop to the bracket.

BMR recommends tightening the main transmission crossmember bolts to 85 ft/lbs and driveshaft loop bolts to 40 ft/lbs.

After lowering the vehicle, the install is complete.

Stay tuned for more stories on Boosted Coyote, where we’ll be putting the Livernois-built bullet to the test on the dyno and the track using our driveshaft safety loop. You won’t want to miss it!



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